Social Studies

Social Studies

Warwick Valley High School

GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 1 HONORS (2210)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Final average 80% or above in Social Studies H or 90% in 8th Grade Social Studies and Teacher Recommendation
Global History & Geography I is the first half of a two-year sequence which culminates in a NYS Regents exam at the conclusion of Global History & Geography II, as well as the first of a four-year series of social studies credits required for graduation. It begins with the Paleolithic Era and the development of the first civilizations, continues with an examination of classical societies, and traces the expansion of trade networks and their global impact. The course emphasizes the key themes of cultural diffusion, trade, migrations, belief systems, conflict, establishment of multiregional empires, and major events and turning points in history. In addition, the course underscores the importance of critical thinking and analysis via primary and secondary sources, as well as focusing on enhancing skills related to stimulus-based questions, constructed response questions (CRQs), and enduring issues essays.

The difference between Honors and Regents lies mainly in the depth and methods of study, not in the subject matter itself.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 1 REGENTS (2211)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Social Studies 8
Global History & Geography I is the first half of a two-year sequence which culminates in a NYS Regents exam at the conclusion of Global History & Geography II, as well as the first of a four-year series of social studies credits required for graduation. It begins with the Paleolithic Era and the development of the first civilizations, continues with an examination of classical societies, and traces the expansion of trade networks and their global impact. The course emphasizes the key themes of cultural diffusion, trade, migrations, belief systems, conflict, establishment of multiregional empires, and major events and turning points in history. In addition, the course underscores the importance of critical thinking and analysis via primary and secondary sources, as well as focusing on enhancing skills related to stimulus-based questions, constructed response questions (CRQs), and enduring issues essays.

The difference between Honors and Regents lies mainly in the depth and methods of study, not in the subject matter itself.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

AP WORLD HISTORY (2259)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Pass Global History & Geography 1 Honors or Regents
The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding will be developed through factual knowledge and analysis. The course will look at the changes that have occurred throughout the world community in history, as well as comparisons among major societies.

This course will cover the full time frame from 1250.C.E. to the present. The course will build upon cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that set the stage for human development.

Students enrolled in this course will be expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May, as well as the Global History Regents if they haven’t previously completed it. There is a fee for students to take the AP exam.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY II REGENTS (2221)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Successful completion of Global History & Geography 1 Regents
Global History & Geography II is the second half of a two-year sequence which culminates in a NYS Regents exam, as well as the second of a four-year series of social studies credits required for graduation. The course provides a snapshot of the world circa 1750 and continues chronologically up to the present. Several concepts are woven throughout the course including industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, conflict, technology, & the interconnectedness of the world. In addition, the course underscores the importance of critical thinking and analysis via primary and secondary sources, as well as focusing on enhancing skills related to stimulus-based questions, constructed response questions (CRQs), and enduring issues essays.

The final examination is a Regents Exam.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

US HISTORY & GOVERNMENT REGENTS (2230)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Successful completion of Global History & Geography 1 Regents and 2 Regents
United States History and Government is the chronological study of major historical events and the people who contributed to our cultural heritage. Major emphasis will be placed on recurring constitutional issues which have become a persistent theme in a democratic republic. The course will provide a brief survey of constitutional foundations from 1787 to 1865 and then concentrate on events from 1865 to the present. Facts will be combined with a conceptual interpretation to gain a greater appreciation and understanding of America’s complex and diverse society.

The course will end with a Regents examination.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

ECONOMICS R (2240)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Successful completion of Global History & Geography 1 and 2, and US History

A semester course designed to provide students with an understanding of basic macro and micro-economic concepts. Economic analysis and critical thinking skills are emphasized through the study of economic models and current economic problems.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

GOVERNMENT R (2241)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Successful completion of Global History & Geography 1 and 2, and US History
Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for establishing governments; the governmental systems of the United States and other nations; the United States Constitution; the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship, including avenues of participation.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

GOVERNMENT 12 SENIOR PROJECT (2242)

GOVERNMENT 12 SENIOR PROJECT (2242)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Passing of US History R or AP. Students must take English SP for Senior year as well as Government SP in the Spring semester. (NOTE**if a student wishes to take AP Gov, they may still take the Senior Project course but they must be enrolled in English SP).

“Explore your passion; discover yourself” is the slogan for the senior Government program, Senior Project.

A nationally-recognized program, Senior Project is a rigorous course that consists of four components: a project based upon a student-generated idea, a 2100-2700 word collegiate-level research paper, a portfolio that visually chronicles the experience, and the Senior Boards, an elaborate presentation to a panel of judges. This course, which includes the curriculum of Government R, is designed for the industrious student who wishes to work extensively and independently on a project of his/her choosing.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

CRIMINAL LAW AND JUSTICE (2256)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Open to students in grades 10-12.
This half-year course places an emphasis on providing high quality education that will prepare students to pursue a career in criminal justice that is effective, ethical, and objective.

This course will comprehensively cover American and criminal law, as it pertains to the law enforcement process. It will examine the rationale for the existence of criminal law, while analyzing important historical precedence, contemporary laws, and the social and individual implications of criminal law. It will also address the roles of police, prosecuting and defense attorneys, judges, and other law personnel as the student is introduced to the American criminal justice system.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

SOCIOLOGY (2251)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Juniors or Seniors or Permission of Instructor
This is a semester course designed as an introductory survey of the topic. Students will, in some way, be exposed to all of the following specialties associated with sociology: Sociocultural Theory, Methodology, Demography, Rural-Urban Sociology, Social Change and Development, Social Organization, Structure and Institutions.

Teaching activities include: Lectures, Mini-Surveys, Class Discussion, Films and Video clips, Individual and Classroom Experiments, Role Playing and Oral Presentations.

Grading is based upon tests, homework, essays on various topics, a course project and final examination.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

PSYCHOLOGY (2253)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Juniors or Seniors or Permission of Instructor
This course has been developed as a survey with the main goal to introduce students to the study of individual human behavior. The course will serve to define and/or explain the terminology, methodology, major theories, historical development and application of research in this area.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

CRITICAL THINKING IN THE HUMANITIES (2258)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Juniors or Seniors or Permission of Instructor
This is a semester course open to all eleventh and twelfth grade students and uses the humanities to foster critical thinking. Through an interdisciplinary approach, students will examine the creative endeavors that have shaped the world around them. Teaching will be designed in a manner that will help students develop skills that are instrumental in improving their ability to think more critically and creatively. During the exploration of art, music, literature, dance, drama, and philosophy, students will learn to apply critical thinking skills to make more informed decisions in everyday life and in considering larger social issues. Course assessments will include reports using scholarly journals and web-based research, a group interdisciplinary project, and a final self assessment activity.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

FINANCIAL LITERACY (2260)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Open to 11th and 12th grade students.
Students will learn how to manage their personal finances and be informed of various financial responsibilities as they relate to banking, credit, budgeting, taxes, payroll, and other financial activities. Students will develop confidence and skills in managing their personal and financial resources. Students will learn how to maximize earning potential, develop strategies for managing resources, and gain insight into the different methods of investing money. Students will develop an understanding of how to make career decisions, use money management skills, consumer credit, and learn about consumer rights and responsibilities. Stock market financial management simulation project will also be implemented in the classroom.

SPORTS HISTORY IN THE WESTERN WORLD (2262)

1/2 Credit     Prerequisite: Open to students in grades 10-12
Sports are a popular and prevalent aspect of society. In each epoch of human history, sports are an integral part of the political and social structures that are dominant at the time. Sports reflect divisions of power, wealth, and class but sometimes conquers these barriers as well. Sports are often dictated by current technology. This course will open students’ eyes and make them conscious of the ramifications of sports in the Western world. Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, sports eras, sports societal themes, developments and turning points in sports societal history.

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (2254)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Pass Global History & Geography II Honors Regents or AP World.
A comprehensive study of United States History designed to provide students with both analytic skills and factual knowledge equivalent to that of a full-year college course.

The course concludes with the  Advanced Placement U.S. History Examination. Some colleges and universities grant credit for scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination. There is a fee to the students for the AP exam.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (2241AP)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Pass AP U.S. History or U.S. History Regents.
A well designed AP course in United States Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. While there is no single approach that an AP United States Government and Politics course must follow, students should become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explorations of various behaviors and outcomes. Please note that this course satisfies N.Y.S. graduation requirements for Participation in Government AND Economics.

Students enrolled in this course will be expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. There is a fee to the students for the AP exam.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

AP PSYCHOLOGY (2257)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Must have passed Global History 2 Honors or Regents.
The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

The course concludes with the Advanced Placement examination in May. Some colleges grant credit for scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the AP exam. There is a fee to the students for the AP exam.

(This course is NCAA-approved.)

AP ART History (2263)

1 Credit     Prerequisite: Open to Grades 10-12
This course offers the serious student the opportunity to explore, in depth, the history of art from ancient times to the present.  Through readings, research, slides, videos, and museum visits, students will view significant artworks from around the world.  Writing skills will be important in the description, analysis, and comparison of these works.  Class discussion and activities focusing on significant historical events, art periods/styles, specific artworks, and issues/themes that connect these artworks.  

The course concludes with the Advanced Placement examination in May. Some colleges grant credit for scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the AP exam. There is a fee to the students for the AP exam.